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Exorcising a boy possessed by a demon

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Exorcising a boy possessed by a demon

Exorcising a boy possessed by a demon is one of the miracles of Jesus in the Gospels, i.e. Mark 9:14-29, Matthew 17:14-21 and Luke 9:37-49.[1][2][3][4] According to the Gospels, Jesus performed this miracle just as he came down from the mountain after his transfiguration.

A man in the crowd asked Jesus to heal his son, who was possessed by a demon, foamed at the mouth, gnashed his teeth and became rigid. The man had asked the disciples of Jesus to drive out the spirit, but they could not. Jesus asked to see the boy. So they brought him. When the spirit saw Jesus, it immediately threw the boy into a convulsion. He fell to the ground and rolled around, foaming at the mouth.

Jesus asked the boy's father, "How long has he been like this?"
"From childhood," he answered. "It has often thrown him into fire or water to kill him. But if you can do anything, take pity on us and help us."
" 'If you can'?" said Jesus. "Everything is possible for one who believes."

Immediately the boy's father exclaimed, "I do believe; help me overcome my unbelief!"

When Jesus saw that a crowd was running to the scene, he rebuked the evil spirit. "You deaf and mute spirit," he said, "I command you, come out of him and never enter him again."

The spirit shrieked, convulsed him violently and came out. The boy looked so much like a corpse that many said, "He's dead." But Jesus took him by the hand and lifted him to his feet, and he stood up.

After the man had gone indoors, his disciples asked him privately, "Why couldn't we drive it out?"

He replied, "This kind can come out only by prayer."

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References

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