World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Eudorcas

Article Id: WHEBN0018240814
Reproduction Date:

Title: Eudorcas  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Thomson's gazelle, List of mammal genera, Flores warty pig, Indian spotted chevrotain, Oliver's warty pig
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Eudorcas

Eudorcas
Thomson's gazelle - Serengeti region of Kenya and Tanzania
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Artiodactyla
Family: Bovidae
Subfamily: Antilopinae
Genus: Eudorcas
Fitzinger, 1869

Eudorcas is a genus of antelope; the species are commonly called gazelles. Eudorcas was originally considered a subgenus of the genus Gazella but has since been elevated to generic status.[1] The four species within the genus Eudorcas are:

Social structure and behavior

Red fronted gazelle - Middle Africa

The social structure of gazelles consists of several types of groups. Male gazelles are territorial throughout their adult lives, though not usually before two to three years of age. During the nonterritorial periods, males usually spend their time in bachelor groups or as part of a mixed herd. Likewise, females will form migratory female groups that travel through the males' territories. As the female groups pass through, the territorial males will try to herd them to prevent them from leaving. Adult males with adjoining territories will engage in combat several times a day, fighting with their horns to establish dominance and the boundaries of their territories. In this way, the accepted boundaries of the territory can change on a daily basis. If a lone male, a bachelor group, or in some cases even an adolescent male fawn of a female gazelle should be passing through a territorial male's region, the male will chase the offender out of his territory. Interestingly, this territoriality does not extend to males of other species.

The territory of a Thomson's gazelle and several other types of ungulates may overlap with no problem whatsoever. Occasionally, a Thomson's gazelle and a zebra or other ungulate will even appear to enjoy one another's company with great sociability. A noticeable behavior of Thomson's gazelles is their bounding leap, known as stotting or pronking, used to startle predators and display strength. Female Thomson's gazelles give birth to single fawns after a five- to six-month gestation period. They are unusual among ungulates in that they can give birth twice yearly, rather than just once. The fawn spends the first few months hiding in the grasses, with the mother coming to feed it daily. When the fawn can take care of itself, it joins the herd. Half of all the fawns born will be lost to predators before reaching adulthood.

References

  1. ^ a b Eudorcas, MSW3
  2. ^ tilonura ssp. Eudorcas rufifrons, IUCN


This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.