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Epanokalimavkion

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Title: Epanokalimavkion  
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Subject: Headgear, Kalimavkion, Hats, Shower cap, Animal hat
Collection: Eastern Christian Liturgical Objects, Eastern Christian Liturgy, Eastern Christian Vestments, Eastern Orthodox Monks, Hats, Headgear
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Epanokalimavkion

Icon of Saint Dimitry of Rostov, wearing a white metropolitan's epanokamelavkion.
Saint Tikhon, Patriarch of Moscow wearing the patriarchal koukoulion with embroidered white epanokamelavkion.

An epanokailimavkion (Greek: επανωκαλυμμαύχιον, also epanokalimafko(επανωκαλύμμαυχο) is an item of clerical clothing worn by Orthodox Christian monastics who are rassophor or above, including bishops. It is a cloth veil, usually black, which is worn with a kamilavkion.

The epanokamelavkion is attached to the front of the kamilavkion and extends over the top to hang down the back, with lappets hanging down on each side. In some traditions, monks leave the lappets hanging over the shoulders, but nuns bring them together and fasten them [1] behind the apostolnik.

In the Russian tradition, the kamilavkion covered by its epanokamelavkion is collectively referred to as a klobuk.

Hierodeacons (i.e., monastic deacons) will remove the epanokamelavkion when they are vested and serving at liturgical services; if they are not serving, however, they will wear it whenever attending services. Monks who have been ordained to minor orders (subdeacon, reader, altar server) do not wear the kamilavka when vested. Hieromonks (monastic priests) always wear the epanokamelavkion whenever they wear the kamilavkion.

In the Russian tradition, the epanokamelavkion of an archbishop has a jewelled cross stitched to the front of it near the crown of the kamilavkion. A metropolitan wears a white epanokamelavkion with the same jewelled cross. The Patriarch of Moscow's epanokamelavkion is often richly embroidered with seraphim or other symbols on the lappets and is attached to a conical kamilavkion called a koukoulion.

The Patriarch of Bulgaria wears a white epanokamelavkion with small cross. The Patriarch of Romania wears a white epanokamelavkion.

On Mount Athos, particular practices may vary from monastery to monastery, but generally speaking—in the Greek monasteries, at least—the epanokamelavkion is not attached to the kamilavkion, but is merely laid over it. The reason for this is that the Athonite typicons call for the it to be removed from the kamilavkion and laid over the shoulders at certain moments during the services.

Sources and references

  • Pictures of Epanokamelavkion and other clerical headgear (German)


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