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Discipline

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Title: Discipline  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Dysfunctional family, Institute of Chartered Accountants of India, Sociology of the family, Tricky Stewart, Communist Party of China
Collection: Behavior Modification, Disciplines, Training, Virtue
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Discipline

To think good thoughts requires effort. This is one of the things that discipline – training – is about.

Discipline is the suppression of base desires, and is usually understood to be synonymous with restraint and self-control. Self-discipline is to some extent a substitute for motivation. Discipline is when one uses reason to determine the best course of action that opposes one's desires, which is the opposite of fun. Virtuous behavior can be described as when one's values are aligned with one's aims: to do what one knows is best and to do it gladly. Continent behavior, on the other hand, is when one does what one knows is best, but must do it by opposing one's motivations.[1] Moving from continent to virtuous behavior requires training and some self-discipline.

Self-discipline

Self-discipline—what many people call "will-power"—refers to the ability to persist at difficult or unpleasant tasks until they are completed. People who possess high self-discipline are able to overcome reluctance to begin tasks and stay on track despite distractions. Those with low self-discipline procrastinate and show poor follow-through, often failing to complete tasks—even tasks they want very much to complete.

See also

References

  1. ^ Fowers, Blaine J. (2008). From Continence to Virtue: Recovering Goodness, Character Unity, and Character Types for Positive Psychology. Theory & Psychology 18, (5). pp. 629–653. 
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