World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Diego Martínez Barrio

Article Id: WHEBN0000294787
Reproduction Date:

Title: Diego Martínez Barrio  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Manuel Azaña, Niceto Alcalá-Zamora, Alejandro Lerroux, Francesc Pi i Margall, Raimundo Fernández-Villaverde, Marquis of Pozo Rubio
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Diego Martínez Barrio

Diego Martínez Barrio
President of the Spanish Republic
Interim
In office
7 April 1936 – 10 May 1936
Preceded by Niceto Alcalá-Zamora
Succeeded by Manuel Azaña
Prime Minister of Spain
In office
8 October 1933 – 16 December 1933
Preceded by Alejandro Lerroux
Succeeded by Alejandro Lerroux
In office
19 July 1936 – 19 July 1936
Preceded by Santiago Casares Quiroga
Succeeded by José Giral
Personal details
Born (1883-11-25)25 November 1883
Seville, Spain
Died 1 January 1962(1962-01-01) (aged 78)
Paris, France
Nationality Spanish
Political party Republican Union Party
Profession politician, journalist

Diego Martínez Barrio (25 November 1883, Seville – 1 January 1962) was a Spanish politician during the Second Spanish Republic, Prime Minister of Spain between 9 October 1933 and 26 December 1933[1] and was briefly appointed again by Manuel Azaña after the resignation of Santiago Casares Quiroga, on 19 July 1936 - three days after the beginning of the Spanish Civil War. From 16 March 1936 to 30 March 1939 Martínez was President of the Cortes. In 1936, he briefly was interim President of the Second Spanish Republic from 7 April to 10 of May.

Biography

Barrio was born in Seville. A member of the Radical Republican Party, he was the Minister in the Alejandro Lerroux government, although later he left the party due to his dissatisfaction with the politics of Lerroux.[2]

Martínez consequently founded and led the Republican Union Party and participated in the Spanish Popular Front,[3] being elected to government in 1936. He led the integration of the Republican Union Party into the Popular Front, being elected the speaker of the Cortes (Spanish Parliament).[4] In February 1939, he rejected to replace Manuel Azaña as president of the Republic.[5] He fled the country after Francisco Franco came to power in 1939.[6]

He was the Grand Master of the Grande Oriente Español from 1929 to 1934.[7]

After the fall of the Republic he went into exile, first to France and then to Mexico where in 1945 he was designated president of the Republic in exile[8] until 1962.[9] Martínez finally returned to Paris, where he died.

In 2000, his remains were moved to Seville.

References

  1. ^ http://www.geneall.net/H/per_page.php?id=467700
  2. ^ Jackson, Gabriel. (1967). The Spanish Republic and the Civil War, 1931-1939. Princeton University Press. Princeton. p. 123
  3. ^ Jackson, Gabriel. (1967). The Spanish Republic and the Civil War, 1931-1939. Princeton University Press. Princeton. p. 185
  4. ^ Thomas, Hugh. (2001). The spanish civil war. Penguin Books. London. p. 152
  5. ^ Jackson, Gabriel. (1967). The Spanish Republic and the Civil War, 1931-1939. Princeton University Press. Princeton. p. 485
  6. ^ Thomas, Hugh. (2001). The spanish civil war. Penguin Books. London. p. 895
  7. ^ 1863-1923, Brief History of the Spanish Masonry
  8. ^ Beevor, Antony. (2006). The battle for Spain. The spanish civil war, 1936-1939. Penguin Books. London. p. 423
  9. ^ Thomas, Hugh. (2001). The spanish civil war. Penguin Books. London. p. 923.

Bibliography

  • Beevor, Antony. The battle for Spain. The Spanish civil war. Penguin Books. 2006. London. ISBN 0-14-303765-X.
  • Thomas, Hugh. The Spanish Civil War. Penguin Books. London. 2003. ISBN 978-0-14-101161-5
Political offices
Preceded by
Niceto Alcalá Zamora
President of the Second Spanish Republic
(acting)

1936
Succeeded by
Manuel Azaña
Preceded by
Santiago Casares Quiroga
Prime Minister of Spain
1936
Succeeded by
José Giral
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.