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Dance move

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Title: Dance move  
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Subject: Connection (dance), Dance, Aerial (dance move), Sprinkler dance, Modern Western square dance
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Dance move

Dance moves or dance steps (more complex dance moves are called dance patterns, dance figures, dance movements, or dance variations) are usually isolated, defined, and organized so that beginning dancers can learn and use them independently of each other. However, more complex movements are influenced by musicality and lyrical relevance to express emotions or refer to a message. Dance moves tend to emphasize the concepts of lead and follow and connection. In most cases, dance moves by themselves are independent of musicality, which is the appropriateness of a move to the music (for a notable exception, see Bharatanatyam). Generally, they are memorized in sets of eight counts. Also there are two different movements: concrete and abstract. These two movements show time, space, relationship, quality and focus. For example, relationship could describe the movement of two or more different dancers. The names of moves may be somewhat arbitrary and vary from person to person and city to city. For example, in Lindy Hop, circles are also called "rhythm circles" and "reverses".

Dance moves may blur into each other. For example, the Lindy Hop move swing out from close can also be thought of as a groucho to open.

Each dance emphasizes its own moves, but often moves are shared by several dances.

See also

References

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