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Corporate video

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Corporate video

Corporate Interview in Studio

Corporate video production refers to B2B environment and viewed only by a limited or targeted audience. This may include product, service or company promotional videos, training videos and information videos.[2] Corporate video production is frequently the responsibility of a company marketing or corporate communications manager. Examples of corporate video include staff training and safety videos, promotional/brand films, and financial results videos.

With the growth of digital technology, there is now often convergence between corporate video and other forms of media communications, such as broadcast television and TV advertising. Also, a corporate video may be produced using the same production techniques and style as a broadcast television programme (such as using outside broadcasting facilities)—as a way of engaging audiences who are used to viewing popular media, a corporate video might even be themed on a well-known television series.

A corporate video production company may typically take the client brief, develop a script or treatment (and sometimes a storyboard), liaise with the client, and agree on a production schedule and delivery date. The time and scale of a corporate video production can vary greatly. Some videos may use only minimal crew and basic equipment, whilst some large scale corporate videos may have similar (or often higher) budgets and level of production than a broadcast television programme or TV commercial.

Add video to your website and dramatically improve the volume and quality of traffic from search engines such as Google, Yahoo and YouTube. Research has shown that an online video is fifty times more likely to hit the front page of Google than single text web page whilst time on site, bounce and click through rates are all improved.[3]

The corporate video production process will frequently involve the following stages:

  • Pre-production, planning includes script writing and storyboarding. The budget will also be agreed at this stage between the production company and client.
  • Video production, including location filming with a camera crew and director. This may also include other elements, such as actors and presenters.
  • Post-production and video editing - the filmed (live action) footage is edited together. This may also include recording an audio voice-over, adding graphics, composing a music score or soundtrack, and including 2D/3D animation sequences with the finished video.

Types and usage

  • Staff training / instruction and safety videos
  • Investor relations / financial results
  • Company promotional/brand videos
  • New product or service online presentations
  • Video role play (often with actors)
  • Client and customer testimonial videos
  • Prom video (A summary of an event or activity is shown)
  • Corporate event filming (for example, a new product launch or conference)
  • Live and on-demand webcasting
  • Technology and product demonstration videos
  • Business television

See also

References

  1. ^ The NewsMarket article on increasing spend on corporate video
  2. ^ IOV definition of corporate video
  3. ^ http://blogs.forrester.com/interactive_marketing/2009/01/the-easiest-way.html

External links

  • Association of Professional Videomakers - A not-for-profit UK trade association for professionals in the video industry
  • Institute of Videography - UK trade association offering advice on wedding and corporate video production
  • The IVCA is a European professional body which promotes best practice for the corporate and public sector communications industry.
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