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Canadian federal election, 1974

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Title: Canadian federal election, 1974  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
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Subject: Canadian federal election, 1979, By-elections to the 30th Canadian Parliament, Sean O'Sullivan (priest), Vancouver East, Gilles Caouette
Collection: 1974 Elections in Canada, Canadian Federal Elections by Year
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Canadian federal election, 1974

Canadian federal election, 1974

July 8, 1974

264 seats in the 30th Canadian Parliament
133 seats needed for a majority
Turnout 71.0%[1]
  First party Second party
 
Leader Pierre Trudeau Robert Stanfield
Party Liberal Progressive Conservative
Leader since April 6, 1968 September 9, 1967
Leader's seat Mount Royal Halifax
Last election 109 seats, 38.42% 107 seats, 35.02%
Seats before 109 106
Seats won 141 95
Seat change +32 -11
Popular vote 4,102,853 3,371,319
Percentage 43.15% 35.46%
Swing +4.73pp +0.44pp

  Third party Fourth party
 
Leader David Lewis Réal Caouette
Party New Democratic Social Credit
Leader since April 24, 1971 October 9, 1971
Leader's seat York South (lost re-election) Témiscamingue
Last election 31 seats, 17.83% 15 seats, 7.55%
Seats before 31 15
Seats won 16 11
Seat change -15 -4
Popular vote 1,467,748 481,231
Percentage 15.44% 5.06%
Swing -2.40pp -2.49pp


Prime Minister before election

Pierre Trudeau
Liberal

Prime Minister-designate

Pierre Trudeau
Liberal

The Canadian federal election of 1974 was held on July 8, 1974 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons of the 30th Parliament of Canada. The governing Liberal Party was reelected, going from a minority to a majority government, and gave Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau his third term. The Progressive Conservatives, led by Robert Stanfield, did well in the Atlantic provinces, and in the West, but the Liberal support in Ontario and Quebec ensured a majority Liberal government.

Contents

  • Overview 1
  • National results 2
  • Vote and seat summaries 3
  • Results by province 4
    • Notes 4.1
  • See also 5
  • References 6

Overview

A key issue in the election was controlling spiralling inflation. Stanfield had proposed a "90-day wage and price freeze" to break the momentum of inflation. Trudeau had ridiculed this policy as an intrusion on the rights of businesses and employees to set or negotiate their own prices and wages with the catch-phrase, "Zap! You're frozen!" In 1975, Trudeau introduced his own wage and price control system under the auspices of the "Anti-Inflation Board".

The New Democratic Party, led by David Lewis, lost less than two-and-a-half percentage points in popular vote, but almost half of their seats in the House of Commons.

The Social Credit Party of Canada, led by Real Caouette, continued to lose ground, and fell to 11 seats, one short of the number required to be recognized as a party in the House of Commons (and therefore qualify for research funds and parliamentary committee memberships). This status was nonetheless extended to the party by the governing Liberals, who believed that Social Credit's support came primarily at the expense of the Tories.

One seat was won in New Brunswick by independent candidate Leonard Jones. Jones, the former mayor of Moncton, had secured the Progressive Conservative nomination, but PC leader Stanfield refused to sign Jones' nomination papers because he was a vocal opponent of official bilingualism, which the PC Party supported. Jones had opposed providing services in French in the City of Moncton even though 30% of the city's population was francophone. Jones ran and won as an independent. After the election, Social Credit leader Caouette invited Jones to join the Socred caucus, which would have given that party enough members for official status. Caouette justified the invitation on the basis that Jones agreed with providing bilingual education at the primary school level. Jones declined Caouette's invitation, and sat as an independent.

National results

The House of Commons after the 1974 election
141 95 16 11 1
Liberal Progressive Conservative NDP SC O
Party Party leader # of
candidates
Seats Popular vote
1972 Dissolution Elected % Change # % Change
     Liberal Pierre Trudeau 264 109 109 141 +29.4% 4,102,853 43.15% +4.73pp
     Progressive Conservative Robert Stanfield 264 107 106 95 -11.2% 3,371,319 35.46% +0.44pp
     New Democratic Party David Lewis 262 31 31 16 -48.4% 1,467,748 15.44% -2.40pp
Social Credit Real Caouette 152 15 15 11 -26.7% 481,231 5.06% -2.49pp
     Independent 63 1 - 1 - 38,745 0.41% -0.18pp
     Unknown 28 - - - - 17,124 0.18% -0.15pp
Marxist–Leninist Hardial Bains 104     -   16,261 0.17%  
Communist William Kashtan 69     -   12,100 0.13%  
     No affiliation 3 1 1 - -100% 551 0.01% -0.24pp
     Vacant 2  
Total 1,209 264 264 264 - 9,507,932 100%  
Sources: http://www.elections.ca History of Federal Ridings since 1867

Note: "% change" refers to change from previous election

Vote and seat summaries

Popular vote
Liberal
  
43.15%
PC
  
35.46%
NDP
  
15.44%
Social Credit
  
5.06%
Others
  
0.89%


Seat totals
Liberal
  
53.41%
PC
  
35.98%
NDP
  
6.06%
Social Credit
  
4.17%
Independents
  
0.38%

Results by province

Party name BC AB SK MB ON QC NB NS PE NL NT YK Total
     Liberal Seats: 8 - 3 2 55 60 6 2 1 4 - - 141
     Popular Vote (%): 33.8 24.8 30.7 27.4 45.1 54.1 47.2 40.7 46.2 46.7 24.7 33.5 43.2
     Progressive Conservative Seats: 13 19 8 9 25 3 3 8 3 3 - 1 95
     Vote: 41.9 61.2 36.4 47.7 35.1 21.2 33.0 47.5 49.1 43.6 33.2 47.1 35.5
     New Democratic Party Seats: 2 - 2 2 8 - - 1 - - 1 - 16
     Vote: 23.0 9.3 31.5 23.5 19.1 6.6 8.7 11.2 4.6 9.5 42.1 19.5 15.4
  Social Credit Seats: - - - - - 11 - -   -     11
  Vote: 1.2 3.4 1.1 1.1 0.2 17.1 2.9 0.4   0.1     5.1
     Independent Seats: - - - - - - 1     -     1
     Vote: 0.1 0.2 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.3 8.1     0.1     0.4
Total seats: 23 19 13 13 88 74 10 11 4 7 1 1 264
Parties that won no seats:
     Unknown Vote: xx 1.0.   0.1 0.1 0.3     0.1       0.2
Marxist–Leninist Vote: 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.4 xx 0.1         0.2
Communist Vote: 0.3 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1             0.1
     No affiliation Vote:         xx xx             xx

xx - less than 0.05% of the popular vote.

Notes

See also

References

  1. ^ Pomfret, R. "Voter Turnout at Federal Elections and Referendums". Elections Canada. Elections Canada. Retrieved 11 January 2014. 
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