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Canada at the Olympics

 

Canada at the Olympics

Canada at the Olympic Games

Flag of Canada
IOC code  CAN
NOC Canadian Olympic Committee
Website www.olympic.ca (English) (French)
Olympic history
Summer Games
Winter Games
Intercalated Games
1906

Canada has sent athletes to every Winter Olympic Games and almost every Summer Olympic Games since its debut at the 1900 games with the exception of the 1980 Summer Olympics, which it boycotted. Canada has won at least one medal at every Olympics in which it has competed. The Canadian Olympic Committee (COC) is the National Olympic Committee for Canada.

At the 2010 Winter Olympics which they hosted in Vancouver, Canada finished atop the medal standings for the first time, winning the most gold medals of any country.

Contents

  • Hosted Games 1
  • Medal tables 2
    • Medals by Summer Games 2.1
    • Medals by Winter Games 2.2
    • Medals at summer sports 2.3
    • Medals at winter sports 2.4
  • Records 3
    • Top Medal earners 3.1
  • See also 4
  • References 5
  • External links 6

Hosted Games

Canada has hosted the Games three times.

Games Host city Dates Nations Participants Events
1976 Summer Olympics Montreal 17 July – 1 August 92 6,028 123
1988 Winter Olympics Calgary 13 – 28 February 57 1,423 46
2010 Winter Olympics Vancouver 12 – 28 February 83 2,629 86

Medal tables

Medals by Summer Games

Number of medals won by Canada at the Olympic summer games from 1900 to 2012.
Games Athletes Gold Silver Bronze Total Rank
1900 Paris 2 1 0 1 2 13
1904 St. Louis 52 4 1 1 6 4
1908 London 87 3 3 10 16 7
1912 Stockholm 37 3 2 3 8 9
1920 Antwerp 53 3 3 3 9 12
1924 Paris 65 0 3 1 4 20
1928 Amsterdam 69 4 4 7 15 10
1932 Los Angeles 102 2 5 8 15 12
1936 Berlin 97 1 3 5 9 17
1948 London 118 0 1 2 3 25
1952 Helsinki 107 1 2 0 3 21
1956 Melbourne 92 2 1 3 6 15
1960 Rome 85 0 1 0 1 32
1964 Tokyo 115 1 2 1 4 22
1968 Mexico City 138 1 3 1 5 23
1972 Munich 208 0 2 3 5 27
1976 Montreal (host nation) 385 0 5 6 11 27
1980 Moscow did not participate
1984 Los Angeles 407 10 18 16 44 6
1988 Seoul 328 3 2 5 10 19
1992 Barcelona 295 7 4 7 18 11
1996 Atlanta 303 3 11 8 22 21
2000 Sydney 294 3 3 8 14 24
2004 Athens 263 3 6 3 12 21
2008 Beijing 332 3 9 7 19 19
2012 London 281 1 5 12 18 36
Total 59 99 121 279 20

Canada also won 1 gold medal and 1 silver medal at the 1906 Summer Olympics, which the IOC no longer recognizes as an official Olympic games, so those medals are not counted in this table.

Medals by Winter Games

Number of medals won by Canada at the Olympic winter games from 1924 to 2014.
   Hosted Winter Games
Games Athletes Gold Silver Bronze Total Rank
1924 Chamonix 12 1 0 0 1 8
1928 St. Moritz 23 1 0 0 1 5
1932 Lake Placid 42 1 1 5 7 4
1936 Garmisch-Partenkirchen 29 0 1 0 1 9
1948 St. Moritz 28 2 0 1 3 6
1952 Oslo 39 1 0 1 2 6
1956 Cortina d'Ampezzo 37 0 1 2 3 10
1960 Squaw Valley 44 2 1 1 4 7
1964 Innsbruck 55 1 0 2 3 10
1968 Grenoble 70 1 1 1 3 13
1972 Sapporo 47 0 1 0 1 17
1976 Innsbruck 59 1 1 1 3 11
1980 Lake Placid 59 0 1 1 2 14
1984 Sarajevo 67 2 1 1 4 8
1988 Calgary 112 0 2 3 5 13
1992 Albertville 108 2 3 2 7 9
1994 Lillehammer 95 3 6 4 13 7
1998 Nagano 144 6 5 4 15 4
2002 Salt Lake City 150 7 3 7 17 4
2006 Turin 196 7 10 7 24 5
2010 Vancouver 206 14 7 5 26 1
2014 Sochi 220 10 10 5 25 3
Total 62 55 53 170 6

Medals at summer sports

   Leading in that sport
Sport Gold Silver Bronze Total
Athletics 13 14 27 54
Rowing 9 16 15 40
Swimming 7 14 22 43
Canoeing and kayaking - Sprint 4 10 10 24
Shooting 4 3 2 9
Boxing 3 7 7 17
Synchronized swimming 3 4 1 8
Freestyle Wrestling 2 7 7 16
Show Jumping 2 2 0 4
Lacrosse 2 0 1 3
Diving 1 4 6 11
Trampoline 1 3 2 6
Track Cycling 1 2 4 7
Triathlon 1 1 0 2
Soccer 1 0 1 2
Golf 1 0 0 1
Artistic Gymnastics 1 0 0 1
Rhythmic Gymnastics 1 0 0 1
Tennis 1 0 0 1
Sailing 0 3 6 9
Judo 0 2 3 5
Weightlifting 0 2 1 3
Mountain Biking 0 2 0 2
Road Cycling 0 1 2 3
Taekwondo 0 1 1 2
Basketball 0 1 0 1
Dressage 0 0 1 1
Eventing 0 0 1 1
Beach Volleyball 0 0 1 1
Total 581 99 121 278

Medals at winter sports

   Leading in that sport
Sport Gold Silver Bronze Total
Ice hockey 131 5 2 201
Speed skating 8 12 15 35
Short track speed skating 8 11 9 28
Freestyle skiing 8 7 3 18
Curling 5 3 2 10
Figure skating 4 10 11 25
Bobsleigh 4 2 1 7
Alpine skiing 4 1 6 11
Snowboarding 3 2 2 7
Skeleton 2 1 1 4
Cross-country skiing 2 1 0 3
Biathlon 2 0 1 3
Total 631 55 53 1711

Canada has never won an Olympic medal in the following current sports: Archery, Badminton, BMX, Canoeing and kayaking - Slalom, Fencing, Field Hockey, Greco-Roman Wrestling, Handball, Indoor Volleyball, Luge, Modern pentathlon, Nordic combined, Rugby, Ski jumping, Table Tennis, and Water polo.

1One of Canada's Ice Hockey gold medals was won during the 1920 Summer Olympics, resulting in the discrepancy between the medals by games and medals by sports tables.

Records

In 2012, Equestrian show jumper Ian Millar competed at his tenth Summer Olympics, tying the record for most Olympic games participated in set by Austrian sailor Hubert Raudaschl between 1964 and 1996. He has been named to eleven straight Olympic teams, but did not compete at the 1980 Summer Olympics due to the Canadian boycott.[1] In 2008 he won his first medal, a silver medal in the team jumping event.[2]

Clara Hughes is the first and only Olympian of any country or gender, to win multiple medals at both the Winter and the Summer Games, with two Summer and four Winter medals.[3] Clara Hughes and Cindy Klassen hold the record for most Olympic medals won by a Canadian of either gender, with six each.[3] Cindy Klassen holds the record for most Winter medals won by a Canadian of either gender, with six.[3]

Catriona Le May Doan became the first Canadian to defend their gold medal at the Olympics. She repeated her gold medal in the women's 500m long track speedskating event at the 2002 Salt Lake City Olympics from the 1998 Nagano Olympics.[4][5]

Alexandre Bilodeau became the first freestyle skiing gold medallist to defend his Olympic title, and first repeat gold medallist, winning the men's moguls at the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics. He became the second Canadian to defend their Olympic gold, and first man.[4][5][6]

After captaining the women's ice hockey team to gold at the 2014 Winter Olympics, Caroline Ouellette became the first Winter Olympian of any country or gender to enter four or more career events and win gold in each.[7] Oullette had previously won gold in ice hockey in 2002, 2006, and 2010.

Jennifer Jones skipped the Canadian women's team at the 2014 Winter Olympics to a Gold medal. She is the first ever female skip in Olympic history to be undefeated throughout the tournament. Jones, Kaitlyn Lawes, Jill Officer, Dawn McEwen and spare Kirsten Wall went unbeaten with an 11-0 record defeating China, Sweden (round-robin and finals), Great Britain (round-robin and semi-finals), Denmark, Switzerland, Japan, Russia, the United States, and Korea.[8][9]

Top Medal earners

Athlete Sport Type Olympics Gold Silver Bronze Total
Klassen, CindyCindy Klassen Speed skating Winter 2002, 2006, 2010 1 2 3 6
Hughes, ClaraClara Hughes Cycling Summer 1996, 2000, 2012 0 0 2 6
Speed skating Winter 2002, 2006, 2010 1 1 2
Hefford, JaynaJayna Hefford Ice hockey Winter 1998, 2002, 2006, 2010, 2014 4 1 0 5
Wickenheiser, HayleyHayley Wickenheiser
Gagnon, MarcMarc Gagnon Short track Winter 1994, 1998, 2002 3 0 2 5
Tremblay, François-LouisFrançois-Louis Tremblay Short track Winter 2002, 2006, 2010 2 2 1 5
Edwards, PhilPhil Edwards Athletics Summer 1928, 1932, 1936 0 0 5 5
Thompson, LesleyLesley Thompson Rowing Summer 1984, 1992, 1996, 2000, 2012 1 3 1 5
Ouellette, CarolineCaroline Ouellette Ice hockey Winter 2002, 2006, 2010, 2014 4 0 0 4
Botterill, JenniferJennifer Botterill Ice hockey Winter 1998, 2002, 2006, 2010 3 1 0 4
Kellar, BeckyBecky Kellar
Hamelin, CharlesCharles Hamelin Short track Winter 2006, 2010, 2014 3 1 0 4
Heddle, KathleenKathleen Heddle Rowing Summer 1992, 1996 3 0 1 4
McBean, MarnieMarnie McBean
Bédard, ÉricÉric Bédard Short track Winter 1998, 2002, 2006 2 1 1 4
Boucher, GaétanGaétan Boucher Speed skating Winter 1976, 1980, 1984, 1988 2 1 1 4
Davis, VictorVictor Davis Swimming Summer 1984, 1988 1 3 0 4
Morrison, DennyDenny Morrison Speed skating Winter 2006, 2010, 2014 1 2 1 4
van Koeverden, AdamAdam van Koeverden Kayaking Summer 2004, 2008, 2012 1 2 1 4
Groves, KristinaKristina Groves Speed skating Winter 2002, 2006, 2010 0 3 1 4
Vicent, TaniaTania Vicent Short track Winter 1998, 2002, 2006, 2010 0 2 2 4
Heymans, ÉmilieÉmilie Heymans Diving Summer 2000, 2004, 2008, 2012 0 2 2 4

See also

References

  1. ^ Martin Cleary (2008-08-08). "'The Olympics is not a young horse game'".  
  2. ^ Doug Smith (2008-08-18). "'Canada wins silver in team show jumping'".  
  3. ^ a b c Canadian Press (22 June 2012). "London 2012: Hesjedal and Hughes to lead Canadian road cycling team at London Games". Toronto Star. Retrieved 29 June 2012. 
  4. ^ a b "Alexandre Bilodeau Wins Gold, Mikael Kingsbury Silver In Olympic Moguls At Sochi". Huffington Post. 2014-02-10. 
  5. ^ a b Eric Koreen (10 August 2012). "Catriona Le May Doan emerging as Olympic broadcasting star". National Post. 
  6. ^ Will Graves (2014-02-10). "Canada's Alex Bilodeau takes gold in men's moguls, first two-time freestyle Olympic champion". Associated Press (The Republic (Columbus, Indiana)). 
  7. ^ Nick Zaccardi (2014-02-20). "An inch to the right and we would have won the gold". NBC Olympic Talk. 
  8. ^ canada.com http://www.canada.com/olympics/columns/jennifer-jones-fights-for-olympic-gold-in-womens-curling-final. Retrieved 21 February 2014. 
  9. ^ Toronto Sun http://www.torontosun.com/2014/02/20/jennifer-jones-sochi-olympics-curling-canada-gold-silver. Retrieved 21 February 2014. 
  • Canadian Medals by Olympic Games at TSN.ca

External links

  • CBC Digital Archives - Gold Medal Athletes - 1948-1968
  • CBC Digital Archives - Cold Gold: Canada's Winter Winners 1984–2002
  • Most Canadian Olympic Medals
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