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Bruce Sterling

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Bruce Sterling

Bruce Sterling
Born (1954-04-14) April 14, 1954
Brownsville, Texas
Pen name Vincent Omniaveritas (in fanzine Cheap Truth)
Occupation Writer, speaker, futurist, design instructor
Nationality American
Alma mater University of Texas at Austin (B.A., Journalism, 1976)
Period 1970s – present
Genre Science fiction
Subject Cyberpunk
Literary movement Cyberpunk/postcyberpunk

Signature
Website
//mirrorshades/conf.com.wellwww

Michael Bruce Sterling (born April 14, 1954) is an American science fiction author who is best known for his novels and his work on the Mirrorshades anthology. This work helped to define the cyberpunk genre.[1]

Contents

  • Writings 1
    • Projects 1.1
    • Neologisms 1.2
  • Personal 2
  • Awards 3
  • Bibliography 4
  • References 5
  • External links 6

Writings

Sterling, along with Turkey City Writer's Workshop, and is a frequent attendee at the Sycamore Hill Writer's Workshop. He won Hugo Awards for his novelettes Bicycle Repairman and Taklamakan.

His first novel, Involution Ocean, published in 1977, features the world Nullaqua where all the atmosphere is contained in a single, miles-deep crater. The story concerns a ship sailing on the ocean of dust at the bottom, which hunts creatures called dustwhales that live beneath the surface. It is partially a science-fictional pastiche of Moby-Dick by Herman Melville.

From the late 1970s onwards, Sterling wrote a series of stories set in the Shaper/Mechanist universe: the solar system is colonised, with two major warring factions. The Mechanists use a great deal of computer-based mechanical technologies; the Shapers do genetic engineering on a massive scale. The situation is complicated by the eventual contact with alien civilizations; humanity eventually splits into many subspecies, with the implication that many of these effectively vanish from the galaxy, reminiscent of The Singularity in the works of Vernor Vinge. The Shaper/Mechanist stories can be found in the collection Crystal Express and the collection Schismatrix Plus, which contains the original novel Schismatrix and all of the stories set in the Shaper/Mechanist universe. Alastair Reynolds identified Schismatrix and the other Shaper/Mechanist stories as one of the greatest influences on his own work.[3]

Bruce Sterling at the 2010 Augmented Reality Event

In the 1980s, Sterling edited the science fiction critical fanzine Cheap Truth, under the alias of Vincent Omniaveritas. He wrote a column called Catscan, for the now-defunct science fiction critical magazine, SF Eye.

He recently contributed a chapter to Sound Unbound: Sampling Digital Music and Culture (The MIT Press, 2008) edited by Paul D. Miller a.k.a. DJ Spooky. He also contributed, along with Lewis Shiner, to the short story "Mozart in Mirrorshades".

From April 2009 through May 2009, he was an editor at Cool Tools.[4]

Since October 2003[5] Sterling has blogged at "Beyond the Beyond", which is hosted by Wired.

His most recent novel (as of 2013) is Love Is Strange (December 2012), a Paranormal Romance (40k).

Projects

He has been the instigator of three projects which can be found on the Web -

  • The Dead Media Project - A collection of "research notes" on dead media technologies, from Incan quipus, through Victorian phenakistoscopes, to the departed video game and home computers of the 1980s. The Project's homepage, including Sterling's original Dead Media Manifesto can be found at http://www.deadmedia.org
  • The Worldchanging. WorldChanging contributors include many of the original members of the Viridian "curia".
  • Embrace the Decay - a web-only art piece commissioned by the LA Museum of Contemporary Art in 2003.[7] Incorporating contributions solicited through The Viridian Design 'movement', Embrace the Decay was the most visited piece/page at LA MOCA's Digital Gallery, and included contributions from Jared Tarbell of levitated.net and co-author of several books on advanced Flash programming, and Monty Zukowski, creator of the winning 'decay algorithm' sponsored by Bruce.

Neologisms

Sterling has a habit of coining neologisms to describe things which he believes will be common in the future, especially items which already exist in limited numbers.

  • In the December 2005 issue of Wired magazine, Sterling coined the term buckyjunk. Buckyjunk refers to future, difficult-to-recycle consumer waste made of carbon nanotubes (a.k.a. buckytubes, based on buckyballs or buckminsterfullerene).
  • In July 1989, in SF Eye #5, he was the first to use the word "slipstream" to refer to a type of speculative fiction between traditional science fiction and fantasy and mainstream literature.
  • In December 1999 he coined the term "Wexelblat disaster", for a disaster caused when a natural disaster triggers a secondary, and more damaging, failure of human technology.[8]
  • In his book Zeitgeist (2000), he introduced the term Major consensus narrative as an explanatory synonym for truth.
  • In August 2004 he suggested a type of technological device (he called it "spime") that, through pervasive RFID and GPS tracking, can track its history of use and interact with the world.[9]
  • In the speech where he offered "spime", he noted that the term "blobject", with which he is sometimes credited, was passed on to him by industrial designer Karim Rashid. The term may originally have been coined by Steven Skov Holt.[10]
  • He discussed and expanded on Sophia Al Maria's neologism "Gulf Futurism" in his column for Wired Magazine "Beyond The Beyond" [11]

Personal

Sterling at Robofest '94

In childhood, Sterling spent several years in India; today he has a notable fondness for Bollywood films.[12] In 2003 he was appointed Professor at the European Graduate School where he is teaching summer intensive courses on media and design.[1] In 2005, he became "visionary in residence" at Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California. He lived in Belgrade with Serbian author and film-maker Jasmina Tešanović[13] for several years, and married her in 2005. In September 2007 he moved to Turin, Italy.[14] He also travels the world extensively giving speeches and attending conferences.

Awards

Bibliography

References

  1. ^ a b Bruce Sterling faculty page at European Graduate School
  2. ^
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  7. ^ "DIGITAL GALLERY: Bruce Sterling: Embrace the Decay", moca.org
  8. ^
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External links

  • Wired Blog : Beyond the beyond
  • Wolf in Living Room - blog about domestic obiquitous computing
  • Works by Bruce Sterling at Project Gutenberg
  • Works by or about Bruce Sterling at Internet Archive
  • Casa Jasmina - the Open Source connected apartment.
  • Bruce Sterling on isfdb
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