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Battle of Gulnabad

Battle of Gulnabad

Modern-day sketch work of Mahmud Hotaki
Date Sunday, March 8, 1722
Location Gonabad, Razavi Khorasan, Iran
Result Decisive Afghan victory
Belligerents
Safavid Empire Hotaki dynasty
Commanders and leaders
Mohammad Qoli Khan
Ali Mardan Khan
Rostam Khan
Seyyed Abdollah[1]
Mahmud Hotaki
Amanullah Khan
Nesrollah[1]
Ashraf Hotaki
Strength
42-50,000+[2][3][4]
  • 24 cannon
11-20,000[5][6]
Casualties and losses
5,000-15,000 soldiers killed[4][7] unknown, believed to be light

The Battle of Gulnabad (Sunday, March 8, 1722) was fought between the military forces from Hotaki Dynasty and the army of the for decades declining Safavid Empire. It further cemented the eventual fall of the Safavid dynasty, who had been declining for decades.

Contents

  • Aftermath 1
  • See also 2
  • References 3
  • Additional reading 4
  • External links 5

Aftermath

After the war was won, the Hotaki's began slowly but sure to march on deeper into Persia, and eventually towards Isfahan, the Safavid Persian capital. Numbers and casualty figures of the Gulnabad battle are believed to be between 5,000 to 15,000 dead Safavid soldiers.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Axworthy (2006), p. 47.
  2. ^ Axworthy, Michael(2009). The Sword of Persia: Nader Shah, from tribal warrior to conquering tyrant,p. 75. I. B. Tauris
  3. ^ Malleson, George Bruce (1878). History of Afghanistan, from the Earliest Period to the Outbreak of the War of 1878. London: Elibron.com. p. 246.  
  4. ^ a b "AN OUTLINE OF THE HISTORY OF PERSIA DURING THE LAST TWO CENTURIES (A.D. 1722-1922)". Edward G. Browne. London:  
  5. ^ Axworthy, Michael(2009). The Sword of Persia: Nader Shah, from tribal warrior to conquering tyrant,p. 77. I. B. Tauris
  6. ^ "Last Afghan empire".  
  7. ^ Axworthy, Michael (2006). The Sword of Persia: Nader Shah, from Tribal Warrior to Conquering Tyrant. London:  

Additional reading

  • Axworthy, Michael (2006). The Sword of Persia: Nader Shah, from Tribal Warrior to Conquering Tyrant. I.B. Tauris, London. ISBN 1-85043-706-8
  • Malleson, George Bruce. History of Afghanistan, from the Earliest Period to the Outbreak of the War of 1878. Elibron.com, London. ISBN 1-4021-7278-8
  • J. P. Ferrier (1858). History of the Afghans. Publisher: Murray.

External links

  • World Timelines - Battle of Gulnabad: Afghans defeat Safavids and take control of most of Persia
  • Conflicts, some details on the battle
  • Battle of Gulnabad, brief

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