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Apple cake

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Title: Apple cake  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: List of cakes, List of desserts, Apple pie, Irish cuisine, Apple products
Collection: Apple Products, British Cakes, British Desserts, Cakes, English Cuisine, German Cuisine, Irish Cuisine, Polish Desserts
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Apple cake

Apple cake
Apple cake
Course Dessert
Main ingredients Flour, butter, sugar, apples
Cookbook: Apple cake 

Apple cake is a popular dessert produced with the main ingredient of apples. Such a cake is made through the process of slicing this sweet fruit to add fragrance to a plain cake base. Traditional apple cakes go a step further by including various spices such as nutmeg or cinnamon, which give a unique flavour. Upon the addition of spices the batter can also be accompanied by crushed nuts, the most popular being walnuts and almonds.

Dorset apple cake,[1] Devon apple cake and Somerset apple cake[1] are traditional forms of this cake, respectively from Dorset, Devon and Somerset, England. They may include apple juices local to these counties as part of their recipes, but are not necessary.

Apples are also used in other cakes, including chocolate cake, where their water-retention can help a normally-dry cake to stay moist. In this case they may be either dried or fresh.

Polish Apple cake

Apple cake called Szarlotka or Jabłecznik is a very popular traditional dessert in Poland. It's made from sweetcrust pastry and spiced apple filling. It can be topped with kruszonka (crumbles), meringue or just dusted with caster sugar. An additional layer of budyń (a polish variation of custard) sometimes can be found. In restaurants and cafes usually served hot with whipped cream and coffee.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Castella, Krystina. A World of Cake: 150 Recipes for Sweet Traditions From Cultures Around the World. Storey Publishing. p. 144.  
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