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Al-Baydawi

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Al-Baydawi

Abdallah ibn Omar al-Baidawi
Died 685 AH (1286 CE)[1]
Religion Islam
Denomination Sunni
Jurisprudence Shafi'i[2]
Creed Ashari[3]

Abdallah ibn Omar al-Baidawi (Arabic: عبدالله بن عمر البيضاوي), also known as Baidawi, was a Muslim scholar, born in Fars, where his father was chief judge, in the time of the Atabek ruler Abu Bakr ibn Sa'd (1226–60). He himself became judge in Shiraz, and died in Tabriz about 1286. Many commentaries have been written on Baidawi's work. He was also the author of several theological treatises.[4]

His major work is the commentary on the Qur'an entitled The Secrets of Revelation and The Secrets of Interpretation (Asrar ut-tanzil wa Asrar ut-ta'wil)'. This work is largely a condensed and amended edition of al-Zamakhshari's (al-Kashshaf). That work, which displays great learning, suffers from Mu'tazilite views which al-Baydawi has tried to amend, sometimes by refuting them and sometimes by omitting them.[5][6] It has been edited by Heinrich Leberecht Fleischer (2 vols., Leipzig, 1846-1848; indices ed. W. Fell, Leipzig, 1878). There are many editions published in the East. A selection with numerous notes was edited by D. S. Margoliouth as Chrestomathia Beidawiana (London, 1894).[4]

Notes

  1. ^ Gibb, H.A.R.; Kramers, J.H.; Levi-Provencal, E.; Schacht, J. (1986) [1st. pub. 1960]. Encyclopaedia of Islam (New Edition). Volume I (A-B). Leiden, Netherlands: Brill. p. 1129.  
  2. ^ Esposito, John L. (2004). The Oxford Dictionary of Islam. Oxford University Press. p. 39.  
  3. ^ Esposito, John L. (2004). The Oxford Dictionary of Islam. Oxford University Press. p. 39.  
  4. ^ a b Thatcher 1911.
  5. ^ Gibb, H.A.R.; Kramers, J.H.; Levi-Provencal, E.; Schacht, J. (1986) [1st. pub. 1960]. Encyclopaedia of Islam (New Edition). Volume I (A-B). Leiden, Netherlands: Brill. p. 1129.  
  6. ^ Thatcher 1911 cites cf. Th. Nöldeke's Geschichte des Qorans, Göttingen, 1860, p. 29

References

    • C. Brockelmann, Geschichte der arabischen Litteratur (Weimar, 1898), vol. i. pp. 416–418.
    This in turn cites:  
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