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Quebec general election, 1998

 

Quebec general election, 1998

Quebec general election, 1998

November 30, 1998

125 seats in the 36th National Assembly of Quebec
63 seats were needed for a majority
Turnout 78.32%
  First party Second party Third party
 
Leader Lucien Bouchard Jean Charest Mario Dumont
Party Parti Québécois Liberal Action démocratique
Leader since January 27, 1996 April 30, 1998 1994
Leader's seat Jonquière Sherbrooke Rivière-du-Loup
Last election 77 seats, 44.75% 47 seats, 44.40% 1 seat, 6.46%
Seats won 76 48 1
Seat change -1 +1 0
Popular vote 1,744,240 1,771,858 480,636
Percentage 42.87% 43.55% 11.81%
Swing -1.88% -0.85% +5.35%

Map of Quebec's ridings coloured in to indicate ridings won by each party and their popular vote. PQ (cyan): 76 seats; Liberal (red): 48 seats; ADQ (blue): 1 seat.

Premier before election

Lucien Bouchard
Parti Québécois

Premier-designate

Lucien Bouchard
Parti Québécois

The Quebec general election of 1998 was held on November 30, 1998, to elect members of the National Assembly of the Province of Quebec, Canada. The incumbent Parti Québécois, led by Lucien Bouchard, won re-election, defeating the Quebec Liberal Party, led by Jean Charest.

After the narrow defeat of the PQ's proposal for political independence for Quebec in an economic union with the rest of Canada in the 1995 Quebec referendum, PQ leader Jacques Parizeau resigned. Bouchard left federal politics, where he was leader of the Bloc Québécois party in the Canadian House of Commons, to lead the Parti Québécois and become premier.

Jean Charest had also left federal politics, where he had been leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada. Charest was initially seen as a bad fit for the Quebec Liberal Party, and for provincial politics. He later overcame this perception.

In terms of the number of seats won by each of the two parties, the result was almost identical to the previous 1994 general election. However, this time the Liberals actually won a slightly larger percentage of the popular vote, but nonetheless far fewer seats.

Mario Dumont, leader of the Action démocratique du Québec, repeated his success in winning his own seat, as he had done in the 1994 general election. However, his party also repeated its failure to elect any other member apart from its leader.

Contents

  • Results 1
  • See also 2
  • External links 3
  • References 4

Results

The overall results were:[1]

Party Party leader Candi-
dates
Seats Popular vote
1994 Elected % Change # % % Change
Parti Québécois Lucien Bouchard 124 77 76 -1.3% 1,744,240 42.87% -1.88%
Liberal Jean Charest 125 47 48 +2.1% 1,771,858 43.55% -0.85%
  Action démocratique Mario Dumont 125 1 1 - 480,636 11.81% +5.35%
     Socialist Democracy Paul Rose 97 - - - 24,097 0.59% -0.26%
Equality Keith Henderson 24 - - - 12,543 0.31% +0.02%
Bloc Pot Marc-Boris St-Maurice 24 * - * 9,944 0.24% *
     Natural Law Allen Faguy 35 - - - 5,369 0.13% -0.72%
Marxist–Leninist   24 - - - 2,747 0.07% +0.04%
     Innovator   20 - - - 2,484 0.06% +0.01%
Communist   20 - - - 2,113 0.05% +0.02%
     Independent/No designation 39 - - - 12,441 0.31% -1.38%
Total 657 125 125 - 4,068,472 100%  
Source: Elections Quebec
Note: * Party did not nominate candidates in the previous election.

Note:

* Party did not nominate candidates in the previous election.

Vote share
PLQ
  
43.55%
PQ
  
42.87%
ADQ
  
11.81%
Socialist Democracy
  
0.59%
Others
  
1.17%
Party Seats Second Third Fourth Fifth Sixth Seventh Eighth Ninth Tenth
Parti Québécois 76 47 1
Liberal 48 75 2
Action démocratique 1 2 117 5
Socialist Democracy 56 33 6 2
Equality 1 3 12 1 4 2 1
Bloc Pot 1 17 6
Natural Law 7 14 10 3 1
Marxist–Leninist 2 5 11 2 4
Innovator 2 7 8 3
Communist 2 3 4 6 3 2
Independent 1 9 14 9 3 2 1

See also

External links

  • CBC TV video clip
  • Results by party (total votes and seats won)
  • Results for all ridings

References

  1. ^ "Résultats officiels par parti politique pour l'ensemble des circonscriptions". Directeur général des élections du Québec. Retrieved 2012-02-03. 
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