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Mountain railway

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Title: Mountain railway  
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Subject: Rack railway, Driving Creek Railway, Hakone Tozan Railway, Anina, Ferdinand Mülhens
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Mountain railway

A mountain railway is a railway that operates in a mountain region. It may operate through the mountains, for example by following mountain valleys and tunneling beneath mountain passes. Or it may climb mountains, in order to provide transport to and from their summits.

Mountain railways often, but by no means always, use narrow gauge to allow for tight curves in the track and reduce tunnel size and structure gauge, and hence construction cost and effort. Where a mountain railway needs to climb steep gradients, it may use steep grade railway technology, or even operate as a funicular railway.

List of mountain railways

See also list of cog and rack railways

Argentina

Australia

Austria

Bolivia

Brazil

Canada

Chile

China

Colombia

Croatia

Eritrea

France

Germany

Georgia

Greece

Hong Kong

India

Isle of Man

Italy

Japan

Mexico

New Zealand

Norway

Peru

Romania

View from Oraviţa - Anina railway in 2010.

Russia

Spain

Switzerland

Taiwan (Republic of China)

United Kingdom

United States

Venezuela

Vietnam

Mountain railways in fiction

The Culdee Fell Railway is featured in the book Mountain Engines, part of The Railway Series by Rev.W.Awdry.

See also

References

  1. ^ Described by the operator, Linz AG Linien In German
  2. ^ Se construye
  3. ^
  4. ^ Map of Huancayo - Huancavelica
  5. ^ Apsheronsk railway
  6. ^ Tourist Railway
  7. ^ Homepage of the Matterhorn-Gotthard-Bahn (in English, German, French)
  8. ^ Waldenburgerbahn

External links

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