Chikankari

Chikan (Hindi: चिकन, Urdu: چکن‎) is a traditional embroidery style from Lucknow, India. Literally translated, the word means embroidery. Believed to have been introduced by Nur Jehan, Mughal emperor Jahangir's wife,[1] it is one of Lucknow's most famous textile decoration styles.

Origin

There are several theories about the origin of Chikankari. Chikankari - the process of chikan - was basically invented in Lucknow. It developed quickly during the period when the Mughals ruled and consisted of styles inspired by Persians. Lucknow grew into an international market for its renowned Chikankari work. There are references to Indian Chikan work as early as 3rd century BC by Megasthenes, who mentioned the use of flowered muslins by Indians. There is also a tale that mentions how a traveler taught Chikankari to a peasant in return of water to drink. However, the Noor Jahan story is the most popular of the lot.[2] The name Chikan has been derived from the Persian word Chakin or Chikeen meaning a cloth wrought with needlework[3]

Chikan began as a type of white-on-white (or whitework) embroidery.

Technique

The technique of creation of a chikan work is known as chikankari (चिकनकारी چکن کاری). Chikankari is a delicate and artfully done hand embroidery on a variety of textile fabric like muslin, silk, chiffon, organza, net etc. White thread is embroidered on cool, pastel shades of light muslin and cotton garments. Nowadays chikan embroidery is also done with coloured and silk threads in different colours to meet the recent fashion trends and keep chikankari trendy with fashion. Lucknow is the heart of the Chikankari industry today and the variety is known as Lucknawi chikan.

The piece begins with the use of one or more pattern blocks that are used to block-print a pattern on the ground fabric. The embroiderer then stitches the pattern, and the finished piece is carefully washed to remove all traces of the printed pattern.[4] Process of Chikankari includes following steps:

  • Design
  • Engraving
  • Block printing
  • Embroidery
  • Washing & finishing

The patterns and effects created depend on the types of stitches and the thicknesses of the threads used in the embroidery. Some of the varieties of stitches used include backstitch, chain stitch and hemstitch. The result is an open work pattern, jali (lace) or shadow-work. Often the embroiderer creates mesh-like sections in the design by using a needle to separate threads in the ground fabric, and then working around the spaces.[4] It consists of 36 different stitches, which are:[5][6]

Front view of Chikan embroidery being done over temporary block printed pattern
Chikan embroidery from the back
  • Tepchi
  • Bakhiya
  • Hool
  • Zanzeera
  • Rahet
  • Banarsi
  • Khatau
  • Phanda''
  • Murri
  • Jali
  • Turpai
  • Darzdari
  • Pechani
  • Bijli
  • Ghaspatti
  • Makra
  • Kauri
  • Hathkadi
  • Banjkali
  • Sazi
  • Karan
  • Kapkapi
  • Madrazi
  • Bulbul-chasm
  • Taj Mahal
  • Janjeera
  • Kangan
  • Dhania-patti
  • Rozan
  • Meharki
  • Chanapatti
  • Baalda
  • Jora
  • Keel kangan
  • bulbul
  • sidhaul
  • ghas ki patti

GI status

Geographical Indication Registry (GIR) accorded the Geographical Indication (GI) status for chikankari in December 2008, which recognized Lucknow as an exclusive hub of chikankari.[7]

References

Further reading

  • Romancing With Chikankari by Veena Singh

External links==

  • Stitches of Chikankari Embroidery
  • Practical Use of Chikankari Embroidery in Plus size women's tunic
  • All About Chikankari
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