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Applications of nanotechnology

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Title: Applications of nanotechnology  
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Subject: Nanotechnology, Impact of nanotechnology, Regulation of nanotechnology, Green nanotechnology, Nanoreactor
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Applications of nanotechnology

The 2000s have seen the beginnings of the applications of nanotechnology in commercial products, although most applications are limited to the bulk use of passive nanomaterials. Examples include titanium dioxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles in sunscreen, cosmetics and some food products; silver nanoparticles in food packaging, clothing, disinfectants and household appliances such as Silver Nano; carbon nanotubes for stain-resistant textiles; and cerium oxide as a fuel catalyst.[1] As of March 10, 2011, the Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies estimated that over 1300 manufacturer-identified nanotech products are publicly available, with new ones hitting the market at a pace of 3–4 per week.[2]

Nanotechnology is being used in developing countries to help treat disease and prevent health issues. The umbrella term for this kind of nanotechnology is Nanomedicine.

Nanotechnology is also being applied to or developed for application to a variety of industrial and purification processes. Purification and environmental cleanup applications include the desalination of water, water filtration, wastewater treatment, groundwater treatment, and other nanoremediation. In industry, applications may include construction materials, military goods, and nano-machining of nano-wires, nano-rods, few layers of graphene,[3] etc.

Applications by type

References

  1. ^ "Nanotechnology Information Center: Properties, Applications, Research, and Safety Guidelines".  
  2. ^ "Analysis: This is the first publicly available on-line inventory of nanotechnology-based consumer products". The Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies. 2008. Retrieved 13 May 2011. 
  3. ^ Jayasena, Buddhika; Subbiah Sathyan (2011). "A novel mechanical cleavage method for synthesizing few-layer graphenes". Nanoscale Research Letters 6 (95).  


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