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Candlelight vigil

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Title: Candlelight vigil  
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Candlelight vigil

A candlelight vigil is an outdoor assembly of people carrying candles, held after sunset in order to show support for a specific cause.[1] Such events are typically held either to protest the suffering of some marginalized group of people, or in memory of a life or lives lost to some disease, disaster, massacre or other tragedy. In the latter case, the event is often called a candlelight memorial. A large candlelight vigil will usually have invited speakers with a public address system and may be covered by local or national media. Speakers give their speech at the beginning of the vigil to explain why they are holding a vigil and what it represents.[2] Vigils may also have a religious or spiritual purpose. On Christmas Eve many churches hold a candlelight vigil.

Candlelight vigils are seen as a nonviolent way to raise awareness of a cause and to motivate change, as well as uniting and supporting those attending the vigil.[1]

Contents

  • Gallery 1
  • See also 2
  • References 3
  • External links 4

Gallery

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "love to know: Organise a candlelight vigil". Retrieved 28 December 2012. 
  2. ^ "Do Something: how to organise a vigil". Retrieved 28 December 2012. 

External links

  • Planning Candle Light VigilsAmerican Medical Students Association,
  • "Example Candle Light Vigil for the Little Ambassador"
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